In health is the notion of “Trust” as important as a good User Experience? A new study offers the stunning truth.

Summary: one new study by Makovsky/Kelton delves into the latest trends of online behavior and the issue of trust among key audiences and healthcare. The results seem to indicate that a good User Experience is almost as important as the source, if not more! Read on for the story and stats, and a few helpful conclusions.

Are we really so superficial? Or have we as consumers finally reached that tipping point of where our Experience with Web site content is truly how we frame our trust of that content? Just check out this chart and see how the “trust” chart line and the “ease-of-use” from the Makovsky “Pulse of Online Search Survey, 2016”.

I love human contradictions. We are so simple and yet so complex. Take a few observations from this chart: Advocacy sites are the most trusted and yet least visited…is that really because their “ease-of-use” is so crude, under-funded and under-engaging? It would seem so.

59% trust Advocacy sites, but only 19% visit them.

53% visit WebMD, but only 39% trust the content.

And for Biopharma? Only 10% visit (OUCH) but of those, around 40% trust the content and find it easy-to-use.

Does that mean that Biopharma’s (bad) reputation is the biggest block to more brand site visitation? Or, as the report teases out, is the real key that Biopharma brands need to pull down the walls and channel the authenticity of the Advocacy groups and their own branded needs? Why can’t Advocacy groups distribute their content on brand sites?  It almost seems a childish church-and-state separation.

Last eye-opening but not surprising stat:

95% of online Searchers (18+) trust their doctor. BUT 62% research the recommended treatment after a visit. Does that tell us that consumers have just embraced this habit, or is it that ever-shorter, ever-less-satisfying visit to the doctor leaves us with more questions than answers? Another reason why Biopharma brands need to accept that patients want the science — brands need to start sharing their clinical information, as well as disease state, with transparency. Patients are looking for that information — but they are not looking at the branded site.

The lead researcher is quite succinct in setting the reality, the challenge and the opportunity for healthcare brands — hospitals or manufacturers — to pay attention to: “The type of health information consumers seek online is changing, as well – with consumer behaviors clearly shifting from symptom-focused research to treatment-focused research, both before and after doctor visits,” commented Alexandra Peterson, SVP and Practice Director, Makovsky Health.“Consumer actions to prepare for and then validate conversations with physicians via online search illustrate the balance between patient empowerment and desire for professional guidance. Combined with the fact that the majority of patients are likely to ask their doctor for a prescription by name, survey results show that patients are walking into the doctor’s office armed with more information than ever, eager to have a more active role in the treatment discussion and decision.”

CX (Customer Experience) is my work and is almost the single greatest thread that goes through every marketing conversation.  As marketing professionals, digitally conversant, we all fret and obsess at the gaps and opportunities clients either do not see, or do not have the ability to act upon. Yet, with every passing day, we all are documenting the Customer Experience in ever greater detail; as we see studies like this we need to view and share them as confirmation we are doing the right thing for our clients, patients and caregivers.

The real insight here is how healthcare and health in general is fast becoming a shopping experience — it used to be “Does it work?” when it came to treatments. Now it seems we consumer are overlaying our shopping habits to health — “I don’t like how this looks or feels”.  Since Biopharma companies DO have a lot to offer patients, focusing on CX and perhaps the trustworthiness of their content needs to come to the forefront of planning any campaign.

In health is the notion of “Trust” as important as a good User Experience? A new study offers the stunning truth.

Summary: one new study by Makovsky/Kelton delves into the latest trends of online behavior and the issue of trust among key audiences and healthcare. The results seem to indicate that a good User Experience is almost as important as the source, if not more! Read on for the story and stats, and a few helpful conclusions.

Are we really so superficial? Or have we as consumers finally reached that tipping point of where our Experience with Web site content is truly how we frame our trust of that content? Just check out this chart and see how the “trust” chart line and the “ease-of-use” from the Makovsky “Pulse of Online Search Survey, 2016”.

I love human contradictions. We are so simple and yet so complex. Take a few observations from this chart: Advocacy sites are the most trusted and yet least visited…is that really because their “ease-of-use” is so crude, under-funded and under-engaging? It would seem so.

59% trust Advocacy sites, but only 19% visit them.

53% visit WebMD, but only 39% trust the content.

And for Biopharma? Only 10% visit (OUCH) but of those, around 40% trust the content and find it easy-to-use.

Does that mean that Biopharma’s (bad) reputation is the biggest block to more brand site visitation? Or, as the report teases out, is the real key that Biopharma brands need to pull down the walls and channel the authenticity of the Advocacy groups and their own branded needs? Why can’t Advocacy groups distribute their content on brand sites?  It almost seems a childish church-and-state separation.

Last eye-opening but not surprising stat:

95% of online Searchers (18+) trust their doctor. BUT 62% research the recommended treatment after a visit. Does that tell us that consumers have just embraced this habit, or is it that ever-shorter, ever-less-satisfying visit to the doctor leaves us with more questions than answers? Another reason why Biopharma brands need to accept that patients want the science — brands need to start sharing their clinical information, as well as disease state, with transparency. Patients are looking for that information — but they are not looking at the branded site.

The lead researcher is quite succinct in setting the reality, the challenge and the opportunity for healthcare brands — hospitals or manufacturers — to pay attention to: “The type of health information consumers seek online is changing, as well – with consumer behaviors clearly shifting from symptom-focused research to treatment-focused research, both before and after doctor visits,” commented Alexandra Peterson, SVP and Practice Director, Makovsky Health.“Consumer actions to prepare for and then validate conversations with physicians via online search illustrate the balance between patient empowerment and desire for professional guidance. Combined with the fact that the majority of patients are likely to ask their doctor for a prescription by name, survey results show that patients are walking into the doctor’s office armed with more information than ever, eager to have a more active role in the treatment discussion and decision.”

CX (Customer Experience) is my work and is almost the single greatest thread that goes through every marketing conversation.  As marketing professionals, digitally conversant, we all fret and obsess at the gaps and opportunities clients either do not see, or do not have the ability to act upon. Yet, with every passing day, we all are documenting the Customer Experience in ever greater detail; as we see studies like this we need to view and share them as confirmation we are doing the right thing for our clients, patients and caregivers.

The real insight here is how healthcare and health in general is fast becoming a shopping experience — it used to be “Does it work?” when it came to treatments. Now it seems we consumer are overlaying our shopping habits to health — “I don’t like how this looks or feels”.  Since Biopharma companies DO have a lot to offer patients, focusing on CX and perhaps the trustworthiness of their content needs to come to the forefront of planning any campaign.

In health is the notion of “Trust” as important as a good User Experience? A new study offers the stunning truth. was originally published on Harbinger Associates

In health is the notion of “Trust” as important as a good User Experience? A new study offers the stunning truth.

Summary: one new study by Makovsky/Kelton delve into the latest trends of online behavior and the issue of trust among key audiences and healthcare. The results seem to indicate that a good User Experience is almost as important as the source, if not more! Read on for the story and stats, and a few helpful conclusions.

Are we really so superficial? Or have we as consumers finally reached that tipping point of where our Experience with Web site content is truly how we frame our trust of that content? Just check out this chart and see how the “trust” chart line and the “ease-of-use” from the Makovsky “Pulse of Online Search Survey, 2016”.

I love human contradictions. We are so simple and yet so complex. Take a few observations from this chart: Advocacy sites are the most trusted and yet least visited…is that really because their “ease-of-use” is so crude, under-funded and under-engaging? It would seem so.

59% trust Advocacy sites, but only 19% visit them.

53% visit WebMD, but only 39% trust the content.

And for Biopharma? Only 10% visit (OUCH) but of those, around 40% trust the content and find it easy-to-use.

Does that mean that Biopharma’s (bad) reputation is the biggest block to more brand site visitation? Or, as the report teases out, is the real key that Biopharma brands need to pull down the walls and channel the authenticity of the Advocacy groups and their own branded needs? Why can’t Advocacy groups distribute their content on brand sites?  It almost seems a childish church-and-state separation.

Last eye-opening but not surprising stat:

95% of online Searchers (18+) trust their doctor. BUT 62% research the recommended treatment after a visit. Does that tell us that consumers have just embraced this habit, or is it that ever-shorter, ever-less-satisfying visit to the doctor leaves us with more questions than answers? Another reason why Biopharma brands need to accept that patients want the science — brands need to start sharing their clinical information, as well as disease state, with transparency. Patients are looking for that information — but they are not looking at the branded site.

The lead researcher is quite succinct in setting the reality, the challenge and the opportunity for healthcare brands — hospitals or manufacturers — to pay attention to: “The type of health information consumers seek online is changing, as well – with consumer behaviors clearly shifting from symptom-focused research to treatment-focused research, both before and after doctor visits,” commented Alexandra Peterson, SVP and Practice Director, Makovsky Health.“Consumer actions to prepare for and then validate conversations with physicians via online search illustrate the balance between patient empowerment and desire for professional guidance. Combined with the fact that the majority of patients are likely to ask their doctor for a prescription by name, survey results show that patients are walking into the doctor’s office armed with more information than ever, eager to have a more active role in the treatment discussion and decision.”

CX (Customer Experience) is my work and is almost the single greatest thread that goes through every marketing conversation.  As marketing professionals, digitally conversant, we all fret and obsess at the gaps and opportunities clients either do not see, or do not have the ability to act upon. Yet, with every passing day, we all are documenting the Customer Experience in ever greater detail; as we see studies like this we need to view and share them as confirmation we are doing the right thing for our clients, patients and caregivers.

The real insight here is how healthcare and health in general is fast becoming a shopping experience — it used to be “Does it work?” when it came to treatments. Now it seems we consumer are overlaying our shopping habits to health — “I don’t like how this looks or feels”.  Since Biopharma companies DO have a lot to offer patients, focusing on CX and perhaps the trustworthiness of their content needs to come to the forefront of planning any campaign.

Makovsky infographic on Search trust

 

 

Thank you to Makovsky Health for their intelligence, generosity and amazing report…

In health is the notion of “Trust” as important as a good User Experience? A new study offers the stunning truth. was originally published on Harbinger Associates

100,000 doctors in school now will NOT go into practice. Why is this good news?

Why would 100,000 doctors currently in medical school not go into practice? Why would they turn away from serving patients and following their mission? And why is this potentially good news?

There are many reasons, some obvious, some not. I am shocked by the number, but not surprised. And you know what, it makes sense. Let’s look at the debate and review some technologies changing health care delivery — created by doctors!

In this post we will review this trend in medicine with Healthtap and Ginger.io.

According to several studies, summarized well in a blog by a medical student, Ryan Gamlin, on MedicalEconomics.com, the list is long:

  • Pressures of the post-ACA medical practice.
  • Conflict between doctors on the front-line and hospital managers minding the spreadsheets, the tedium of a partially broken system.
  • The lure of technology and its broader, and more innovative impact on patients and the healthcare system.

From the  NPR’s December 2015 story, “Siren Song Of Tech Lures New Doctors Away From Medicine” to a recent  in the Society of Hospital Medicine’s monthlyThe Hospitalist, “Concerns Grow as Top Clinicians Choose Nonclinical Roles”, the reason for not going into traditional practice almost seems logical. In many ways, this turn away from tradition is driven by the need of many doctors to fix the system, to provide better care and deliver it through technology.

First is HealthTap: A video and text-based 24/7 doctor-on-call service. They have great marketing, a great service and as they wrote to me in  an email:

“With HealthTap Prime, you’ll have unlimited: 24/7 access to primary care; Live video or text chat virtual consults; Medical advice anytime, anywhere; Prescriptions, lab tests, and so much more!”

HealthTap opening App screen:

I have not engaged with them, but every time I call to see my GP, and begin to have what I call the “scheduling wrestling match” I pause and think about the appeal of HealthTap’s on-demand health service promise. Whats more, their branding is simple and almost charming: “Doctors are making house calls again.” Kind of appealing when you find out you can’t get to see your doctor for two weeks about that nagging cough.

Even HealthTap’s registration is very friendly and ignores the technology for the human aspect of their service.

Diving into more specific condition management and support, Ginger.io app for mental illness is truly progressive and has overcome many of the reasons the adoption of mHealth apps has been so poor — the App is multi-dimensional and evolves with you.

 Conclusion: technology has taken over the point-of-care, but not always in a positive, helpful way. The idea that doctors’ have decided to embrace technology over practice is not as simple as it sounds. If they choose in-practice, they are less masters of their own fate that chattel to the hospital procedures and formulary that owns them; yet if they chose technology, they could impact entire population grounds and be the Agents of Change we need right now.

BTW, the future of medicine is either a bull to ride or be run over by…

Thank you getreferralmd.com for the infographic.

https://getreferralmd.com/2013/11/health-care-technology-innovations-2013-infographic/

 

Many thanks to Ryan Gamlin (@ryangamlin), a former health care management consultant and current medical student at the University of Cincinnati. Also to MedicalEconomics.com and NPR being so smart and insightful with their content.

100,000 doctors in school now will NOT go into practice. Why is this good news? was originally published on Harbinger Associates

100,000 doctors in school now will NOT go into practice. Why is this good news? was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Does Biopharma “get” the role of caregiver? Do any of us really market to their needs? Ask 65 million people. (Part 1 of 2).

Summary: 65 million caregivers. Their role is often undefined, undeserved and undersupported. Are we as marketers, and as human beings, missing out on a key audience and the opportunity to engage with a key Influencer? Caregivers challenges are formidable — there must be ways to help. While this is an ever-growing part of the population, we as brand marketers in healthcare need them on our side — or rather, we need to be at their side!

Remember, when your branded treatment needs to be part of the conversation, a caregiver may be your best sales force! 

So, best advice: don’t reinvent the wheel. Check out the numerous existing resources (some examples in this post) before developing any strategy; look to partner for credibility and to tap into an already existing expertise. People are already doing it right: learn before you spend.

Let’s look at a recent study by AARP . In a recent study by AARP* titled “Valuing the Invaluable 2015 Update: Undeniable Progress but Big Gaps Remain”.

Here are some startling facts (with an infographic to add depth):

  • Family caregivers in the U.S. provided 37 billion hours of care
  • This is worth an estimated $470 billion—to their parents, spouses, partners, and other adult loved ones in 2013.
  • The total estimated economic value of this uncompensated care provided by the nation’s family caregivers surpassed total Medicaid spending ($449 billion), and nearly equaled the annual sales ($469 billion) of the four largest U.S. tech companies combined (Apple, Hewlett Packard, IBM, and Microsoft) in 2013.
  • 74% of workers at some point during their career provide care to a loved one.
  • Approximately 18% of caregivers say they are “highly strained” financially because of their care giving responsibilities.
  • 1 in 3 have no help at all, paid or unpaid, the report found.
  • In the U.S. alone, 65.7 million people provide care to an older adult.

Let’s not lose sight that these aren’t numbers, they’re humans. Armies of human beings, individuals, each with their own needs and story. This is what lies behind the numbers. Let’s use these infographic from 101 Mobility to show the burden of tasks and time:

What does this mean to marketers? First, if you are going to address and engage with the caregiver as a branded treatment, study all the current digital and offline resources available — caring.com, caregiver.com, even the BMS unbrandedwww.navigatelungcancer.com.

More on what are good resources to research to help define your marketing strategy in Part 2 on Caregivers. (Part 2 later this week!)

 

Thank you to: http://101mobility.com/blog/tag/infographic. Thank you to AARP for doing the good work we as a society need.

*AARP “Valuing the Invaluable” 2015 Report.

Does Biopharma “get” the role of caregiver? Do any of us really market to their needs? Ask 65 million people. (Part 1 of 2). was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving

IMS is a highly trusted source of news and data for the entire healthcare industry. But often the focus is on Biopharma — and in this one specific instance — a new update on their tracking the evolution of health apps for patients and doctors.

They report that as of end of 2015, there were over 165,000 health-related apps in the market. In this report, IMS analyzed over 26,000 of these apps. While improvement has occurred from earlier reports (which had the abysmal stats of 75% of all health apps abandoned after 3 months!) there is still much work to do.

But this new report is a mixed bag or encouraging progress and what is still left to do to truly make a health app data-safe, integrates better User Experience customer-centric and relevant over time. Let’s look he highlights…because I have a much more in-depth post coming on cutting edge apps for mental illness.

As the leader of the report, Murray Aitken puts it very succinctly: “While much progress has been made over the past two years, mHealth apps are still far from being a fully integrated component of healthcare delivery,” said Murray Aitken, executive director of the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. “Healthcare providers are actively addressing the remaining barriers. These include developing and adopting trusted platforms for ongoing apps curation and evaluation, creating practical reimbursement models and ensuring true interoperability within and across healthcare systems.”

The IMS report source: https://goo.gl/jT5zJP

The highlights:

  • App connectivity becomes a major focus for developers
  • Overwhelming choice without guidance limits usefulness of healthcare apps; over half of all health app downloads come form just 96 apps. That sure speaks to a lot of wasted money and time.
  • A growing movement is underway to build evidence supporting the value of mHealth apps.
  • Providers agree that the value mHealth apps can deliver is high, but barriers to full adoption remain.

The industry is at an important stage of evolution — the old lackluster, brand-centric approach to app development is giving way to greater focus on passive data collection and relevance.

Stay tuned for more on mHealth apps…lots of change, lots to say!

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates

Biopharma listened! IMS reports on health apps improving was originally published on Harbinger Associates